Select Page
Opposing New Zealand's press restrictions on the coverage of Brenton Tarrant's trial is not some abstract free speech argument, it's about reining in a media that thinks it knows what's best for the public. The country's five major media corporations responsible for the coverage of the proceedings against the man accused of killing 50 people during the March 15 shootings at two Christchurch mosques, have signed a voluntary "indefinite" protocol "to limit any coverage of statements that actively champion white supremacist or terrorist ideology." The outlets will not cite excerpts from the gunman's manifesto, 'The Great Replacement', they will not quote anything he says in support of his actions, and if he does a raised-arm salute or perhaps even the OK sign (the neo-Nazi gesture du jour) these can only be shown in pixelated form. This has been widely received as an unequivocally virtuous gesture - "not giving the extremist a platform" is being treated as a win for ethics over...