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Valerie Plame, the CIA siren who starred in the century’s silliest scandal, is back in the news.

Running as a Democrat for the open seat in New Mexico’s Third Congressional District, Plame has had to explain why in 2017 she retweeted an arguably anti-Semitic article by CIA veteran Philip Giraldi headlined, “America’s Jews Are Driving America’s Wars.”

Plame’s alibi has been that she “messed up” and only “skimmed” the article before retweeting it. This is nonsense. At the time she shared the article Plame called it “thoughtful” and urged her followers to read it.

Missed in the halfhearted coverage of Plame’s tweet is the chronic dishonesty and anti-Semitism that made Plame and her ambassador husband, Joseph Wilson, media darlings in the first place.

On June 14, 2003, when Wilson spoke at the Education for Peace in Iraq Center (EPIC), he laid the blame for the Iraq war at the foot of an endangered class of Jews.

In his conspiratorial zeal, Wilson shed useful light on the not so subtle anti-Semitism that was oozing through the cracks in the left’s “intersectional” façade long before Ilhan Omar became a household name.

“I remain of the view,” Wilson told the EPIC forum crowd, “that we will find chemical and biological weapons, and we may well find something that indicates that Saddam’s regime maintained an interest in nuclear weapons.”

Wilson made this extraordinary statement just weeks before his celebrated New York Times op-ed about President Bush’s alleged WMD deceptions.

This one sentence would seem to undercut the argument waged by him and literally millions of other self-deluding progressives around the world that “Bush lied” about Iraq’s WMD threat.

If Bush’s most hostile critics in the intelligence community believed Saddam possessed such weapons, one has to ask why Bush would have needed to fabricate evidence.

In July 2003, however, Wilson was not denying the existence of weapons of mass destruction. He was suggesting instead that there was an altogether different agenda behind the drive to liberate Iraq, a much more sinister one.

Given America’s “real agenda,” Wilson found it “not surprising” that Saddam would pursue nuclear weapons “in a part of the world where you do have a nuclear-armed country, an enemy of yours, which is just a country away from you.” The enemy he referred to here was not Iran, but Israel.

Before this friendly, left-leaning audience, Wilson casually dismissed the liberation of Iraq, Iraq’s terrorist connections and the talk of WMDs as mere distractions.

In Wilson’s book, Israel was the primary reason why the United States went to war against Iraq.

He might have made a credible case if he spoke of the need to defend the one functioning democracy in that benighted part of the world, to forestall a second Holocaust, to prevent Saddam from destroying Tel Aviv with a few well-aimed VX-tipped missiles, or even to stop him from commissioning suicide bombers.

But no, as Wilson saw it, the Iraq war was waged for no nobler purpose than “to make [Prime Minister Ariel] Sharon’s life easier.” By “easier” Wilson meant that the removal of Saddam would “provide the Israeli government with greater wherewithal to impose its terms and conditions on the Palestinian people.”

As Wilson explained, those plans were hatched by Richard Perle and his study group some years back. And now, as a result, “American boys and girls are dying for Israel.”

Wilson did not specify that Richard Perle or Ken Adelman, whom he also mentioned, were Jewish. That much was understood. On the left, “neocon” long ago became code for “Jew.”

Plame’s CIA pal Giraldi saw no need to use code. His article was no dog whistle. It was a full-throated bark.

Giraldi listed a slew of Washington insiders who opposed the Obama Iran nuclear deal and concluded, “And yep, they’re all Jewish, plus most of them would self-describe as neoconservatives.”

He further argued, “The media should be required to label [these Jewish neocons] at the bottom of the television screen whenever they pop up … as ‘Jewish and an outspoken supporter of the state of Israel.'”

If his point wasn’t toxic enough, Giraldi added, “That would be kind-of-like a warning label on a bottle of rat poison.”

Plame and Wilson lied their way to fame and fortune. It remains to be seen whether Democratic voters will let Plame lie her way into Congress.

The post The roots of Valerie Plame's anti-Semitism appeared first on WND.