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Promises made, promises kept.

That has been President Trump's unofficial motto since he started implementing his ambitious conservative agenda almost immediately after his inauguration (remember the uproar over the first iteration of the Trump travel ban?)

But apparently, Tucker Carlson believes Trump's claim that he has kept all of his campaign promises is disingenuous. During an interview with Die Weltwoche, the Fox News host and founder of conservative media website The Daily Caller accused Trump of not being "capable" of executing his duties as president in what might be the most incisive criticism of President Trump and his agenda delivered by a Fox News personality.

Carlson

The fact that Carlson is giving an interview to Switzerland's "Newspaper of Record" isn't surprising since gangs of Antifa thugs effectively ran him out of his home by threatening his wife (" Tucker, we know where you sleep at night!") He's spent the past month off the air at Fox,

Do you think he has kept his promises? Has he achieved his goals?

No.

He hasn't?

No. His chief promises were that he would build the wall, de-fund planned parenthood, and repeal Obamacare, and he hasn't done any of those things. There are a lot of reasons for that, but since I finished writing the book, I've come to believe that Trump's role is not as a conventional president who promises to get certain things achieved to the Congress and then does. I don't think he's capable. I don't think he's capable of sustained focus. I don't think he understands the system. I don't think the Congress is on his side. I don't think his own agencies support him. He's not going to do that.

I think Trump's role is to begin the conversation about what actually matters. We were not having any conversation about immigration before Trump arrived in Washington. People were bothered about it in different places in the country. It's a huge country, but that was not a staple of political debate at all. Trump asked basic questions like' "Why don't our borders work?" “Why should we sign a trade agreement and let the other side cheat?” Or my favorite of all, "What's the point of NATO?" The point of NATO was to keep the Soviets from invading western Europe but they haven't existed in 27 years, so what is the point? These are obvious questions that no one could answer.

But that wasn't the only criticism levied at Trump during the interview. Carlson also complained about Trump's "boastfulness" after his Swiss interviewer acknowledged that the Swiss are generally suspicious of braggarts.

The Swiss are very suspicious of anybody who is boastful. That's why I have a question about Trump…

…I hate that about him. I hate that… it's not my culture. I didn't grow up like that.

Though he did spare a few unkind words for the Democrats, whom Carlson accused of abandoning the middle class. He even traced the exact moment when the party "shifted" its alignment away from the workers and in favor of a more corporatist approach: This shift happened during the tech boom years of Clinton's second term.

The Democratic Party is out of touch with the working class.

Well, that's the remarkable thing. For 100 years the Democratic Party represented wage earners, working people, normal people, middle class people, then somewhere around-- In precisely peg it to Clinton's second term in the tech boom in the Bay Area in Francisco and Silicon Valley, the Democratic Party reoriented and became the party of technology, of large corporations, and of the rich. You've really seen that change in the last 20 years where in the top 10 richest zip codes in the United States, 9 of them in the last election just went for Democrats. Out of the top 50, 42 went for Democrats. The Democratic Party, which for 100 years was the party of average people is now the party of the rich.

Donald Trump, who is often seen as this world-changing figure is actually a symptom of something that precedes him that I sometimes wonder if he even understands which is this realignment. He served the purpose of bringing the middle class into the Republican Party, which had zero interest, no interest in representing them at all. Trump intuitive, he felt, he could smell that there was this large group of voters who had no one representing them and he brought them to the Republican side, but the realignment is still ongoing.

In other words, the Democratic Party used to represent the middle class, it no longer does, it now hates the middle class. The Republican Party which has never represented the middle class doesn't want to. That is the source of really all the confusion and the tension that you're seeing now. I do think, going forward the Republican Party will wake up and realize these are our voters and we're going to represent them whether we want it or not.

Well, that's the remarkable thing. For 100 years the Democratic Party represented wage earners, working people, normal people, middle class people, then somewhere around-- In precisely peg it to Clinton's second term in the tech boom in the Bay Area in Francisco and Silicon Valley, the Democratic Party reoriented and became the party of technology, of large corporations, and of the rich. You've really seen that change in the last 20 years where in the top 10 richest zip codes in the United States, 9 of them in the last election just went for Democrats. Out of the top 50, 42 went for Democrats. The Democratic Party, which for 100 years was the party of average people is now the party of the rich.

Asked if he's ever spoken with Trump, Tucker said he does, on occasion, receive calls from Trump - though Tucker said he's not a policy advisor to the president (before adding that he could easily be one, because, in Carlson's estimation, most policy advisors are "pretty stupid.")

I read that the President is watching your show regularly?

Yes.

Have you heard from him? Has he ever commented on your show?

Yes. Occasionally he'll call.

Does he say you did a good job or what does he say?

Yes. No. Not regularly, but I've heard from him before and I am emphatically not a policy adviser to him or anyone. My job is just to say what I think is true.

Toward the end of his interview, Carlson was asked about the trend of former Fox News stars like Megyn Kelly faltering after leaving the network. Carlson said the key is to "not go crazy." Carlson's own star has only risen since former Fox stalwarts like Kelly and Carlson's predecessor in prime time, Bill O'Reilly, left the network.